Dabbling in #Adulthood

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NB: I feel like I have to preface this by saying, these views are entirely my own. For the first time in my ‘professional’ life, I feel confident in my position. As a media student who has been made fully aware of the tentative position of our industry and the difficulty of securing entry-level positions that will not murder your soul or passion for life, it’s a pretty bold statement. But after attaining a part-time position at Ogilvy PR following my internship, it’s one that I’m very proud and excited to make.

 

It seems like this was a long time coming – a social media obsessed kid moving into a social media career. However, before my internship, I couldn’t quite conceive a role purely in social media existing. I still get worried that my lack of real experience or even understanding of the broader PR landscape could be limiting. For one, it’s too early to rule myself out and reject the possibility of learning more and progressing into more traditional PR roles. But secondly, I am becoming increasingly aware that this may be no problem at all.

 

Social media is an incredible technology that has revolutionised the world of communication. Time and time again, I’ve written essays – and, somewhat ironically, blog posts and tweets – about how social media has transformed political communication, civil society and the PR industry itself. This change is irreversible and disruptive. The ways in which we conceive traditional models of media and of democracy have had to account for the ways that social media challenge power, dissent and society, causing fundamental change in the media and political landscape.

 

I predict that social media is just getting started. We have yet to fully explore the possibilities of social media to create and foster robust political discussion and in turn, meaningful political participation. The role of social media-centric divisions within PR is not only here to stay, but set to grow and begin to dominate PR strategy and practices. No matter how traditional PR campaigns remain – with press releases, media relations and even into the worlds of advertising and marketing – digital and social are always going to be an integral part of the strategy.

 

I’m excited about the way social media will transform PR and hopefully the way my career will progress with it. I’ve finally found an internship – and, more importantly, a job – that I’m excited and interested about. I can see a future with this sort of career as is; but am all the more optimistic about the future of a social media career as the technology continues to evolve and change itself and the environment around it.